Cheryl A. Snyder
Phone:  610-346-7908Office:  215-538-4400
Email:  csnyder@remax440.comCell:  215-801-0583Fax:  267-354-6905
Cheryl A. Snyder
Cheryl A. Snyder

Cheryl's Blog

Turned Down for a Mortgage? Read This before Reapplying

November 23, 2015 1:10 am

Turned down for a mortgage? You’re not alone. Many borrowers are finding it difficult to navigate lending requirements and reapply for a loan to buy a home, despite significant improvement in the housing market.

If your mortgage application was rejected, take heart. Mike Sullivan, director of education for Take Charge America, a national nonprofit credit and housing counseling agency, says prospective homebuyers can successfully reapply if they consider the following factors:

Cash Flow – One of the primary roadblocks to obtaining a mortgage is cash flow. At a minimum, borrowers need a 3-percent down payment and about $1,500 for closing costs. They must also take moving and ongoing maintenance costs into account, including utility deposits, appliances, a lawn mower, curtains and other miscellaneous expenses. As a general rule, prospective homebuyers should have at least $10,000 saved before shopping for a home.

Credit – Many young people today haven’t used credit, aside from student loans, so lenders have difficulty assessing their ability to pay back the home loan. Borrowers who fall into this bucket need to focus on building a positive credit history with three trade lines, such as a credit card, auto loan and signature loan, for at least two years before attempting to reapply.

Lifestyle – Many consumers assume if they can qualify for a loan, they can afford a house. With lenders approving 31 percent of gross salary for a house payment and 43 percent for all debt service, it’s easy to buy a house one can’t afford. It’s important to remember the mortgage is only part of the financial picture. Ongoing costs such as commuting, utilities, HOA fees, landscaping and general home maintenance need to be seriously considered, as well. It’s wise to limit house payments to 28 percent of gross income, and all debt service to no more than 34 percent.

“Many individuals and families are ready to pursue their dreams of homeownership after overcoming financial struggles, but they don’t always have a clear picture of what it takes, or how a mortgage could impact their long-term financial picture,” says Sullivan. “The more knowledge they obtain before entering the lending process, the better.”

Source: Take Charge America

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How Household Spending Changes in Retirement

November 20, 2015 1:04 am

On average, households spend less once they retire—but not all households, and not in the same ways, report analysts at the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI). In fact, according to a recent EBRI study, nearly half of retired households actually spent more than they did just before retirement. That spending, however, declines over time—by the sixth year of retirement, just a third spend more than they did pre-retirement.

“We also found that households that spent more in the first two years of retirement were not exclusively high-income households,” says Sudipto Banerjee, research associate at EBRI and author of the report. “Rather, they were distributed across all income levels.”

Furthermore, the median household had a home mortgage payment before retirement, but none after, indicating paying off a mortgage could be a factor in the timing of retirement, according to the study.

Other findings include:

• In the first two years of retirement, median household spending dropped by 5.5 percent from pre-retirement spending levels, and by 12.5 percent by the fourth year of retirement. The spending reduction slowed down after the fourth year. 

• In the first two years of retirement, two in five households (39.3 percent) spent less than 80 percent of their pre-retirement spending. By the sixth year of retirement, a majority (53.1 percent) of households did so. 

• In the first two years of retirement, 28.0 percent of households spent more than 120 percent of their pre-retirement spending. By the sixth year of retirement, 23.4 percent of households still did so.

Source: EBRI

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Mortgage Rates Hold Steady

November 20, 2015 1:04 am

Average fixed mortgage rates remain largely unchanged as analyst expectations turned from world events to the Federal Open Market Committee’s (FOMC) October minutes, Freddie Mac recently reported. According to Freddie Mac’s Primary Mortgage Market Survey® (PMMS®), the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage (FRM) averaged 3.97 percent with an average 0.6 point; the 15-year FRM averaged 3.18 percent with an average 0.5 point.

"Treasury yields stabilized about 5 basis points below last week's level as the market shrugged off economic data and world events and turned its attention to the minutes of the October FOMC meeting,” says Freddie Mac Chief Economist Sean Becketti. “In response, the 30-year mortgage rate ticked down a basis point to 3.97 percent. The FOMC minutes were couched in careful Fed-speak, and early market reaction was mixed, with most analysts reading their own expectations into the minutes."

Additionally, the 5-year Treasury-indexed hybrid adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) averaged 2.98 percent with an average 0.5 point, and the 1-year Treasury-indexed ARM averaged 2.64 percent with an average 0.3 point.

Source: Freddie Mac

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Renters Have Spoken: Apartment Dwellers Favor Walkability, Concierge-Style Service

November 20, 2015 1:04 am

Just shy of 40 million Americans call an apartment home—and according to recently released research, many are seeking amenities rivaling that of a five-star hotel. Amenities found in the research, compiled by the National Multifamily Housing Council/Kingsley Associates 2015 Apartment Resident Preferences Survey, include walkable neighborhoods, package pick-up services and online rental payment options.
 
“There have been 1.6 million new renter households created in the past five years,” says Rick Haughey, vice president of Industry Technology Initiatives with the National Multifamily Housing Council. “Many of these new residents are making a lifestyle choice to rent instead of buy and are thus looking for personalized services and amenities. The apartment industry is stepping up to provide those experiences.”
 
While many factors are considered during an apartment search, some of the most important concern location convenience and community amenities, the research found. Apartment renters have strong opinions about walking versus driving to their regular destinations:

• Walking wins over driving for getting to the grocery store (by 7 percentage points);
• Walking wins over driving for getting to a restaurant or bar (by 6 percentage points for both); and
• Walking wins over driving for getting to public transit (by 19 percentage points).

Conversely, driving is preferred over walking when:

• Traveling to work (by 24 percentage points);
• Traveling to school (by 7 percentage points); and
• Traveling to a college or university (by 6 percentage points).

Package pick-up services are also favored by apartment renters, according to the research. Currently, 88 percent of management offices accept packages for residents, and 72 percent of residents want a package storage or holding area. Eighty-seven percent of respondents say they are not willing to pay for a package locker, but if there were a charge, they would expect to pay around $20 per month.
 
In addition, 78 percent of apartment renters would like to the option to pay rent online, and 63 percent were interested in paying rent with a credit card.
 
Source: NMHC

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The Social Security Sweet Spot: Deciding When to Claim Benefits

November 19, 2015 1:01 am

Many of us plan to claim Social Security benefits upon reaching full retirement age—but according to a recent report by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), knowing exactly when to claim benefits is unclear. In response to those findings, the CFPB has released “Planning for Retirement,” an interactive tool designed to help individuals before making a claim.

“Millions of Americans are likely to face financial insecurity in their retirement years,” says CFPB Director Richard Cordray. “Deciding when to start claiming Social Security benefits is one of the most important financial choices a consumer will make. The CFPB’s ‘Planning for Retirement’ tool can help consumers clearly see their options.”

According to the report, many Americans collect Social Security benefits early, despite living longer. On average, Americans reaching age 65 today will live to age 85, meaning they’ll likely need sufficient income and savings to cover 20 years or more in retirement. Additionally, approximately two-thirds of the nearly 40 million Americans aged 65 and older who receive Social Security benefits depend on it for 50 percent or more of their retirement income. For a growing number of beneficiaries aged 80 and older, Social Security benefits account for 70 percent or more of their income.

Americans are eligible to claim Social Security retirement benefits without any reduction at their “full retirement age,” according to the Social Security Administration. For people born after 1942, full retirement age ranges from 66 to 67, depending on the year the person was born. Individuals can also claim their benefits several years before, agreeing to take less money each month, or they can claim several years after and get bigger monthly checks.

Generally, the amount an individual receives from Social Security is a one-time choice. This means if an individual claims the reduced or increased benefit, they receive that amount for the rest of their life, with annual cost-of-living adjustments.

The tool can be found at www.consumerfinance.gov/retirement/before-you-claim/.

Source: CFPB.gov

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7 Steps to a Safer Home for the Holidays

November 19, 2015 1:01 am

Gearing up for guests this holiday season? If so, now’s the time to ensure your home is safely outfitted for company. According to the remodelers of the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB), homeowners who expect visitors, especially elderly individuals, should assess their homes for hazards, and, if necessary, increase accessibility to accommodate their needs.

“Welcoming loved ones to your home is a cherished holiday tradition,” says NAHB Remodelers Chair Robert Criner, a remodeler from Newport News, Va. “By making some simple home modifications, you can ensure that family and friends will enjoy a comfortable visit and be able to maneuver around your house without trouble this year.”

Steps to take include the following:

1. Secure rugs and carpets. Secure area rugs with non-slip pads or double-sided carpet tape so that they are snug to the floor. Temporarily remove throw rugs, including bathroom mats, to prevent guests from tripping on the edges.

2. Test stair railings. Check that stair railings inside and out are tightly fastened. Make repairs where needed.

3. Turn up the lights. Put night lights in bathrooms, the guest bedroom, hallways and in the kitchen. Make sure there is a lamp or light switch within reach of the guest bed so that your visitor can keep a light on until safely tucked in. Well-lit outdoor walkways and entrances are also important when coming or going at night.

4. Clear outdoor walkways. Rake leaves, salt for ice and shovel snow from sidewalks and driveways to prevent falls.

5. Add non-slip treads or a mat to the shower. Be sure the shower your guest will use has a non-slip floor. To enhance traction, apply non-slip strips or a suction-attached non-slip mat.

6. Offer the best seat. Choose the best seat for your guest’s comfort—not too high, not too low. A firm cushion can prevent them from sinking too low in to the seat, and arms can help a person easily get up and down.

7. De-clutter. Move objects or even furniture that a person usually has to maneuver around. Secure cords to the wall or baseboards with hooks to prevent tripping. Clear stair steps of any objects, such as shoes, books, and other personal items, that tend to collect on the lower treads.

Source: NAHB

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Green Homes Favored Across the Board

November 19, 2015 1:01 am

During the housing downturn, green homes provided support to the ailing residential market. Now, green homes promise to be an important element of the recovering market, according to a recently released study by Dodge Data & Analytics in partnership with the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) and with the support of Ply Gem Industries. In fact, a high percentage of home builders and remodelers report individuals of all ages are interested in green homes and features—and particularly those over age 55.

"Builders and remodelers have long recognized that green is the future of home building," says Tom Woods, a home builder from Blue Springs, Mo., and chairman of the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). "Since we first began partnering on this study with Dodge Data & Analytics in 2006, we've seen that commitment grow. The study's recent findings reinforce this continued growth, with new homeowner feedback showing a desire and expectation that new homes be high-performing, particularly when it comes to energy conservation.”

Per the study, 54 percent of home builders and nearly 40 percent of remodelers are currently constructing or remodeling at least 16 percent of their homes green. By 2020, 81 percent of home builders and 74 percent of remodelers anticipate constructing or remodeling at the same level of green.

Key factors driving the growth of green are the association of green homes with healthier living and the increasing use of renewable energy. According to the study, nearly half of home builders and remodelers (48 percent) expect to be using solar photovoltaic and ground source heat pump technologies.

Net zero homes are also emerging as an important trend, with nearly a quarter (21 percent) of home builders having built a net zero home in the last two years.

Source: Dodge Data & Analytics

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5 Ways to Prepare Your Deck for Winter

November 18, 2015 1:01 am

(Family Features) Foot traffic, summer storms, scorching heat, high humidity—your deck has seen it all this summer. But did you know colder months can also bring a slew of wearing elements?

According to Wood. It’s Real., funded by the Southern Pine Awareness Network (SPAN), an information clearing house for homeowners, snow, ice, wet slush and lack of sunlight can cause significant damage to your deck if left unattended. To stave off this damage—and avoid replacement altogether—Wood. It’s Real. recommends:

• Packing. Now is the time to do some seasonal de-cluttering. Store items such as planters, which can cause decay and discoloration if they remain on the deck all winter, and put away furniture and cushions you don't expect to use until warmer weather returns.

• Cleaning. Use a power washer to remove accumulated dirt and any signs of staining or damage, such as mildew. Remember that cleaning isn't just about appearance; it's also about protecting the woodwork. Be sure to wash both the top and bottom of the deck.

• Inspecting and repairing. Inspect your deck for signs of wear and tear from the warmer months and make any necessary repairs or upgrades. If your deck falls into disrepair, replace boards or the entire deck using a cost-effective wood (such as Southern Yellow Pine) that resists the aging process.

• Protecting. You can easily test whether it's time to add a protective coating to your deck by checking whether water beads or soaks into the wood. You may be able to spot treat with waterproofing or stain by sanding the affected areas and reapplying. However, if the problem area is widespread or you can't remember the last time you stained or waterproofed the entire deck, it's probably time to do it again.

• Maintaining. Shovel snow regularly using a plastic shovel—metal shovels can ding and gouge wood. Use sand rather than salt or ice melt products that can harm the surface of your deck, and be sure to brush off any excess after melting.

Source: Wood. It’s Real.

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The Leading Causes of Home Fires

November 18, 2015 1:01 am

Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and New Year’s Eve are peak days for home fires—and the leading causes are cooking a holiday meal or burning decorative candles, reports the National Fire Prevention Association (NFPA).

"These statistics are a serious reminder of how the excitement of holiday entertaining can quickly turn into a life-altering fire or even a tragic injury or death," says Sue Steen, chief executive officer of Servpro Industries, Inc. "While glowing candles and elaborate meals set the stage for a great holiday get-together, homeowners need to exercise extra care in controlling the dangerous potential for fires."

According to the NFPA, unattended cooking is by far the leading cause of home cooking fires, with frying posing the greatest fire risk and electric ranges posing a higher risk than gas ranges. Range top cooking in general starts the majority of home cooking fires.

Candles are another leading cause of home fires. Unattended or abandoned candles account for a large portion of candle fires—almost 20 percent—but the most frequent cause of candle fires is placing the candle too close to something that can burn, like curtains, decorations or furniture.

To keep your family and home safe from fire, remain vigilant as to its causes, even amid holiday celebrations, Steen says.

Source: SERVPRO®

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Study: Solar Energy Systems Boost Home Values

November 18, 2015 1:01 am

Considering a solar-powered home? Your dollars will be well spent. According to a recent study produced by the Appraisal Institute, “Appraising Into the Sun: Six-State Solar Home Paired-Sales Analysis,” homes with host-owned solar photovoltaic energy systems are sold at a premium compared to homes without PV systems.

Appraisal Institute researchers concluded the location, age, size and efficiency must be considered in determining the value of a PV system. The value also is impacted by local factors, such as the retail cost of electricity and any local incentives provided for those who own a PV system.

The study, released by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, compared comparable sales of 43 homes in six states: California, Florida, Maryland, North Carolina, Oregon and Pennsylvania. For each of the properties, researchers generated contributory-value estimates based on gross cost (PV cost before incentives), net cost (PV cost after incentives) and income (value of energy savings from PV systems, calculated using the PV Value® tool).

Source: Appraisal Institute

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